Corel AfterShot Pro

This software is used from time to time for the reasons mentioned below and as such can be part of my workflow, but because it is only used occasionally I will not be going into any great detail. I should mention that this is the only non-free software on my PC, I download a trial to test if the software could address a couple of shortcomings with Darktable (previous post), it turned out it could! one of these was chromatic aberration, because I only work in JPEG the Darktable CA plugin does not function (RAW only), I had tried a couple of plugins for Gimp but found them lacking in one way or another, the CA filter in Corel AfterShot Pro worked fine on JPEG images (more info below), the other shortcoming to be addressed was image noise reduction, Darktable has a couple of plugins for this but one of them is very slow (the most effective one!), I had seen that Corel AfterShot Pro incorporates a light version of Noise Ninja which I knew from previous experience was leading software for noise reduction, so that was the clincher. There is a  a good demonstration video on their website if you wish to delve deeper into what the software is capable of, one point of interest is that it is multi-platform with versions available for Linux, Windows and Mac, the interface is again similar to Lightroom, but personally I find it a little cluttered, because some parts can be collapsed it is possible to improve this a little, but I prefer the Darktable approach (configurable). If I had started off with AfterShot Pro and had never used Darktable then I am sure I could have used this software for almost all editing, it is a very powerful package, RAW, JPEG and TIFF formats are supported, if you do install the software it is a good idea to let Aftershot Pro index your images, otherwise you can miss out on certain functions (example: editing history) but be warned it takes quite a long time to index and produce thumbnails if you have thousands of images!

Corel Aftershot Pro interface

Corel Aftershot Pro interface

The software uses tabs (right hand panel) to access the different modes, lots of tools and sliders, again I won’t go into any detail on this, just basicly cover the two points I have mentioned previously, it’s perhaps difficult to see on the above screenshot but Noise Ninja is the next to last slider on the right hand panel, works great if used correctly, not really much to add on this, the CA sliders (see image below) which can be found under the Detail tab are marked R/C and B/Y, the R/C slider adjusts the red channel to correct red or cyan fringes, and the B/Y slider adjusts the blue channel to correct blue or yellow fringes, it’s not automatic but it is very easy to use and works well on JPEG images,

C/A sliders

C/A sliders

It is perhaps of interest to know that it is only recently since buying a DSLR (Canon EOS 600D) that I have really become aware of CA in some of my images, previous bridge camera’s have obviously had more effective in camera filtering.

 

 

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